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Miracle of the Eucharist of Turin Audiobook - Bob and Penny Lord
Bob and Penny Lord Ministry

Miracle of the Eucharist of Turin Audiobook

Authors: Bob and Penny Lord

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Miracle of the Eucharist of Turin Audiobook

Authors: Bob and Penny Lord
Narrator: Luz Elena Sandoval-Lord
Publisher: Journeys of Faith
Format: Audiobook mp3 download
17 Minutes

 

The Miracle of the Eucharist of Turin when God used a Donkey to convey a message.

The History of our Church has been one of turmoil.

God uses many means to get the job done, people, situations, and very often, miracles.  At Turin God Created a Miracle of the Eucharist and used a donkey.

 When the Piedmontese troops crossed into the country of Exilles, and the troops from Anjou approached, all the peasants, indeed, everyone living in that area, left their homes and evacuated the area. After the battle, the troops from Anjou retreated from the countryside. The Piedmontese soldiers began looting the homes and churches in the villages. One particular soldier entered the local church in Exilles, and forced open the tabernacle door, to steal the monstrance. He grabbed it, knowing, but not caring that he had also taken the Consecrated Host contained inside, the Body of Christ.

The monstrance was used for Benedictions. The soldier threw the monstrance into his sack, and loaded it onto his donkey. The animal was uncomfortable with the sack on his back, probably because the Lord made it that way. The sack kept falling off the animalís back. The soldier wanted to get rid of his stolen goods anyway, so he sold the entire sack to the first merchant he came across, at what we would call a highly discounted price. That merchant in turn sold the sack to another merchant, who sold it to another merchant. By the time the last merchant bought the sack, he was headed for Turin. He entered the city with a mule carrying the sack.

At the church of Saint Sylvester, the donkey stumbled and fell. His owner tried to get him up. The animal refused to move. His owner began to beat him. A crowd gathered. No one liked to see animals mistreated. The larger the crowd, the more frustrated the merchant became. He beat the mule unmercifully. Fear filled the eyes of the donkey. He didn't know what to do. He did not want to be beaten by his master. But he couldn't get up. He looked for help from the crowd. They yelled at his owner, but none lifted a hand to help the mule. He moved from side to side, trying to avoid the lashes of his master. The sack slipped from the mule's back, and fell to the ground, spilling the contents all over the street. All eyes focused on the monstrance, or rather the Host inside. It glistened, becoming so bright that they had to avert their eyes from the glare. The monstrance rose into the air, to a height of about 10 or 12 feet high, at which point It stopped, and remained suspended in the air. The crowd uttered gasps of disbelief at the Miraculous Sign in their midst. From the Church of St. Sylvester, Fr. Coccono noticed the crowd, and came to see what was attracting them. Once he saw the monstrance floating freely in the air, he was aware that this was a sign from the Lord. The priest ran off to inform the Bishop of what was happening. The Bishop immediately assembled a procession of priests from the Cathedral, and started off towards the Square. Word spread quickly, and officials of the city filed in behind the procession to the Square. When the bishop arrived at the scene, the monstrance opened, and fell to the ground, leaving the Sacred Host in suspension. It was surrounded by a dazzling aura. The bishop began chanting a hymn in Latin, joined by the priests. The townspeople sang "Resta con noi", "Stay with us". The Host began Its descent. The bishop held out a chalice. The Miraculous Host floated down, and gently landed in the chalice. The townspeople marveled at this, and followed the bishop in procession to the Cathedral.

THE DATE OF THIS MIRACLE IS JUNE 6, 1453. 


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